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Silkirk First Nation

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POPULATION From 1997 First Nations register by DIAND

 : 469

ADDRESS

 : P.O. Box 40


Pelly Crossing, YT
Y0B 1P0

OFFICES found by travelling highway

 : P.O. Box 40

DISTANCE from capital city of Whitehorse, Yukon

 : 281 Kilometres, 175 Miles

Traditional LANGUAGE

 : Northern Tutchone of Athapaskan Descent

Affiliated TRIBAL COUNCIL

 : Northern Tutchone Tribal Council

 DEVELOPMENT corporation

 : Selkirk Development Corporation

Community NAME

 :

Pelly Crossing


Community Name History

The present location of Fort Selkirk was established in 1851 by Robert Campbell to trade with the Chilkat Indians.


 

 

 

 

UP to Selkirk First NationSelkirk First Nation
 
 

Traditional Way of Life

"The Selkirk people were one of the eleven Northern Tutchone bands or local groups, for which the headquarters were located at Tatlmain Lake, Stewart River, lower Macmillan River, Aishihik Lake, Hutshi Lake, White River, Braeburn Lake, Tatchun Lake, Little Salmon and Big Salmon Rivers."(Booklet - "A Look Back in Time- The Archaeology of Fort Selkirk by Heritage Branch of the YTG p. 12)
The Selkirk people were nomads migrating annually in search for food sources in the lower Pelly River area. Fort Selkirk territory was one of the last places to be visited by Europeans. Campbell`s journals provide the earliest written account of the people. He called them Gens de Bois (People of the Forest) or Lewes River Indians. The people themselves used the Northern Tutchone language Thi Ts`ach`an Huch`an after the name of their former king salmon fish camp at Victoria Rock (Thi Ts`ach`an) (same booklet as above)

 

 


 

 

UP to Selkirk First NationSelkirk First Nation
 

Tourism Development

Pelly Crossing is today the principal community of the Selkirk First Nation.

"... The valley in which Stewart Crossing is located (known as the Tintina Trench) is one of the most remarkable divisions in the geology of North America(Burn 1985) The lead, zinc and silver sulphides in the area make up some of the most important mineral deposits in the Yukon Territory." (Silver Trail Tourism Plan- Background Report 1997, P.6)

 


 

 

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